History Materials

Books
Other Revolutionary War Resources

Recent Posts from Colonial History Websites

Journal of the American Revolution
  • by Ken Shumate
    “The King had evidently consented to the repeal, and then disavowed his Ministers.”—Horace Walpole, Memoirs of the Reign of King George the Third In… The post The Strange Affair of the King and the Repeal of the Stamp Act appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.
  • by Sarah Swift
    The American Revolution was perhaps America’s first civil war—a dispute that forced neighbors to choose between country and King; to declare themselves Patriots or… The post Searching for Samuel’s Service: Stories of the Revolution Revealed Through One Man appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.
  • by Don N. Hagist
    BOOK REVIEW: The Sewing Girl’s Tale: A Story of Crime and Consequences in Revolutionary America by John Wood Sweet (New York: Henry Holt and Company,… The post The Sewing Girl’s Tale: A Story of Crime and Consequences in Revolutionary America appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.
  • by Editors
    On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor William W. Reynolds on his examination of the surrender documents from Yorktown discovering differences between… The post This Week on Dispatches: William W. Reynolds on the Yorktown Surrender Documents appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.
  • by David Price
    In 1776, John Cadwalader was a thirty-four-year-old merchant and prominent member of the Philadelphia gentry who had risen to command the volunteer militia known… The post The Significance of John Cadwalader appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.
National Public Radio
The American Revolution Institute
  • by ARI Editor
    Among the most curious treasures in the library of the American Revolution Institute is a monochrome aquatint with etching of a properly dressed gentleman with his left hand gripping the pommel of his sword and his right arm draped around a bare-breasted woman whose arm is curled suggestively around his neck. The legend reads The […]
  • by ARI Editor
    In 1787 Thomas Jefferson was in Paris, wasting his time as ambassador from a government that had so little authority that the French government could safely ignore it. Many of Jefferson’s American friends, including James Madison, were deeply concerned about violent unrest driven by high taxes and the burden of debts compounded by deflation. In […]
  • by ARI Editor
    The American Revolution was a peculiar sort of revolution, and not least because it was led by men we find it hard to imagine as revolutionaries. George Washington, George Mason, and John Hancock were respected and wealthy members of the gentry. They had everything to lose and apparently little to gain from revolution. They were […]
  • by ARI Editor
    What did George Washington look like? We know, or think we know, because we have seen dozens of portraits of him. We carry his image in our pockets, on our dollar bills and our loose change. And though the most familiar portraits by Gilbert Stuart, Charles Willson Peale and John Trumbull differ somewhat, most of […]
  • by ARI Editor
    On the night of March 5, 1770—251 years ago tonight—a party of British soldiers shot and killed five Bostonians in an event known ever since as the Boston Massacre. The killings shook the loyalty of Britain’s North American colonists to the British government. John Adams wrote that the “foundation of American independence was laid” that […]