Durs Egg Breechloading Musket

Morphy Auctions offered a very interesting British rifle recently: a Durs Egg Ferguson breech loading rifle circa 1776. Only 100 of these rifles were constructed and fewer than two dozen remain today. The rifle being auctioned is serial number 2. The Ferguson breech loading rifle was constructed by four British firearms makers, one of which
Skinner Auctioneers Historic Arms & Militaria auction on November 2nd in Marlborough, MA has an interesting item: British Pattern 1756 Long Land Service Musket Marked to the 4th Regiment of Foot. The auction catalog describes the musket as follows: British Pattern 1756 Long Land Service Musket Marked to the 4th Regiment of Foot, or the Kings
At most of the Indiana Revere’s Riders events, the last point of instruction is nearly always a short lesson on “known distance” and adjusting your sights. The trajectory of a bullet after it leaves the rifle barrel is explained along with the concept of a “near zero” and “far zero”. Before everyone’s eyes glaze over,
On this day, August 8th, 1754 in Philadelphia, PA, Joseph Greer was born. One of eleven children, his family would move to the frontier of Staunton, Virginia and later the Watauga River area of Tennessee. In 1769 Joseph, his father and brothers were among 40 men who would defend Fort Watauga from more than 300 Indians—he had just turned 15. During
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In his General Orders of August 7, 1782 issued from his headquarters in Newburgh, New York, George Washington decreed the creation of two Honorary Badges of Distinction and a Badge of Military Merit. Previous custom was to only present military honors to the high-ranking officers of victorious forces rather than honoring individual soldiers. Of the
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On this day, July 13th 1729, Captain John Parker was born. “Stand your ground. Don’t fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here.” Captain John Parker’s words to his men on Lexington Green on April 19, 1775 have become inextricably associated with the beginnings of the Revolutionary
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On July 9, 1776, the Declaration of Independence was read for the first time in New York in front of George Washington and his troops. In reaction to what had been read, soldiers and citizens went to Bowling Green, a park in Manhattan, where a lead statue of King George III on horseback stood. The
One of our experienced volunteers found an interesting document from the Concord, MA Chamber of Commerce with an hour-by-hour account of the events of April 19, 1775.  While the pamphlet has limited citations for its sources its a quick and easy read that outlines the major events of the day and is well worth checking
On this day in 1779, Hugh M. Brackenridge delivers an Eulogium to those gathered in Pennsylvania to honor those who have fallen during the Revolutionary War: “IT is the high reward of those who have risked their lives in a just and necessary war, that their names are sweet in the mouths of men, and
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An Ode for the 4th of July 1788

AN ODE FOR THE 4th OF JULY 1788., OH for a muse of fire! to mount the skies And to a list’ning world proclaim— Behold! behold! an empire rise! An Æra new, as he flies, Hath enter’d in the book of fame. On Alleghany’s tow’ring head Echo shall stand—the tidings spread, And o’er the lakes, and
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